Social Communities Need Governance Too

Can your receptionist set-up new Outlook Groups? Are users requesting new Microsoft Teams for every reason under the sun? Has your Yammer gotten out of control?  Are users confused about where they should collaborate? Well then, let's talk about Governance and why it goes beyond just the larger collaboration platforms like SharePoint. Governance Plans are the key to successful deployments. It is important to plan, plan, plan and plan some more. 

 

Myth: Social Community Self-Service is Good

Enterprise Social Community Management

 

 

 

 

Most social platforms allow new groups to be created by anyone. Proper governance does not allow anyone to set-up new groups at their pleasure. As part of your governance plan make sure to specify who will create and retire your various social communities. Then, adjust your settings to limit this function to an administrator.  Once disabled, only an administrator should be able to set-up new social groups. 


Requests for Additional Social Groups 

Avoid setting users up for failure by creating new groups without properly vetting the need or venue. Groups aren't always the correct place for people to collaborate. Depending on what the needs are, your administrator should feel empowered to suggest other options. Users should be required to document the purpose of the new group, as well as what additional users need permissions to the group. Additional values to consider include asking for start and end dates, group name and permissions required. Enterprise social solutions are intended for collaboration. But, if too many groups exist that are poorly defined, users will choose to collaborate elsewhere or choose another unsuitable location.  

Download Enterprise Social Governance Charter

The Enterprise Social Community Charter

One easy way to make sure to collect all the necessary information about a new group, is to provide a Charter for users to complete as part of the request process. A Charter is a quick and easy method for allowing users to explain their intent for new sites while providing enough information for an administrator to set-up sites.

 

I've provided a helpful Enterprise Social Charter Template to get you started.  Depending on the size and needs of your organization, modify the template according to your situation. Click here to download the Social Community Charter Template. 


Want to go one step further?  Create a PowerApp or SharePoint list for managing your social community charters!

 

Social Content Clean Up

Take time to plan your internal Governance. Even the smallest SharePoint deployments can grow rapidly and get out of control quickly.  Providing clear, concise instructions will make site management and governance enforcement much easier.


Additional Resources

Groups in Dynamics:

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dynamics365/customer-engagement/basics/collaborate-with-colleagues-using-office-365-groups

 

Governance Planning: 

https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/mt631711(v=office.16).aspx


 

 

Groups Need Governance Too

Can your receptionist set-up new Outlook Groups? Are users requesting new Outlook Groups for every reason under the sun? Are users confused about where they should collaborate? Well then, let's talk about Governance and why it goes beyond just the larger collaboration platforms like SharePoint. Governance Plans are the key to successful deployments. It is important to plan, plan, plan and plan some more. 

Lock-Down The Self-Service

By default Outlook Groups can be created by anyone. Proper governance does not allow anyone to set-up new groups at their pleasure. As part of your governance plan make sure to specify who will create and retire Outlook Groups. Then, adjust your settings to limit this function to those designated roles. 

 

All users, by default, can create Groups in Outlook 365. 

To disable the ability to create Groups for all users:


set-OwaMailboxPolicy -GroupCreationEnabled $false -Identity OwaMailboxPolicy-Default

 

Users will not have an option to create a new group. 




What if the user is in their mailbox? 

The user will see a the option to add a new group but when it is selected the user will see an error message. 



How do you revert back to allowing users to create groups?


set-OwaMailboxPolicy -GroupCreationEnabled $true -Identity OwaMailboxPolicy-Default

Requests for Additional Outlook Groups 

Avoid setting users up for failure by creating new groups without properly vetting the need or venue. Groups aren't always the correct place for people to collaborate. Depending on what the needs are, your administrator should feel empowered to suggest other options. Users should be required to document the purpose of the new group, as well as what additional users need permissions to the group. Additional values to consider asking for include start and end dates, group name and permissions required. Outlook Groups are intended for collaboration. So, if too many groups exist that are poorly defined, users will choose to collaborate elsewhere or choose another unsuitable location.  

 

Got a Charter?

One easy way to make sure to collect all the necessary information about a new group, is to provide a Charter for users to complete as part of the request process. A Charter is a quick and easy method for allowing users to explain their intent for new sites while providing enough information for an administrator to set-up sites. You can find a sample Community Charter template here

 

Keeping Up With Content and Clean Up

Take time to plan your internal Governance. Even the smallest SharePoint deployments can grow rapidly and get out of control quickly.  Providing clear, concise instructions will make site management and governance enforcement much easier.

 

 

Additional Resources

Groups in Dynamics:

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dynamics365/customer-engagement/basics/collaborate-with-colleagues-using-office-365-groups

 

Governance Planning: 

https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/mt631711(v=office.16).aspx